• English
  • Persian
  • 简体中文
  • Русский
  • français
  • español
  • Português
  • Arabic
  • Vietnamese

What can international students see and do in Oxford?

Posted 13 October 2014
Ashmolean Museum Oxford

Posted in

Share:

Moving to a new city to study is an exciting part of the UK university experience, and for international students there’s the added element of discovering a new country. While settling in, it’s a great idea to take advantage of all of the fascinating things to see, do and explore in your new city. Getting to know the place a bit better will make it feel more like home. 

Moving to a new city to study is an exciting part of the UK university experience, and for international students there’s the added element of discovering a new country. While settling in, it’s a great idea to take advantage of all of the fascinating things to see, do and explore in your new city. Getting to know the place a bit better will make it feel more like home.

Oxford’s historic and academic heritage stretches back centuries, and the city is a popular choice for both UK and international students. The location offers a wide range of attractions and activities, especially for those interested in the arts. Here are just a few of the things that international students can see and do in and around Oxford.

The Ashmolean

Arts students in particular will want to head to the world-famous Ashmolean museum, to discover its unique and varied collection of artefacts. Inside you’ll find both archaeological pieces and fine arts, including pieces by Pissaro, Turner and Cezanne as well as a large collection of Japanese art. The museum is housed in a building, which is one of Oxford’s stand-out pieces of architecture. It often hosts exhibitions, which bring together ideas from the worlds of art, history and art history. Add the Ashmolean’s collections to your must-see list, and you’ll probably find you’re tempted back for more than one visit.

Take a walking tour

Oxford is a wonderful city to walk in – picturesque and full of history. While it’s easy to take in the architecture and other beautiful surroundings by yourself, it’s worth getting an expert to explain the historical side. Fortunately, Oxford has plenty of knowledgeable tour guides who regularly take visitors around the city, teaching them about its rich cultural and historical background. The walks tend to be focused on particular themes, which participants can chose to suit their particular interests.

Pitt Rivers Museum

Housed within Oxford’s Museum of Natural History, the Pitt Rivers Museum is a collection of thousands of curious objects, all crammed into a small space to be explored and enjoyed. The unique collection features curiosities from all around the world, giving great insight into how different cultures interpret similar objects. There are few museums like it, so it is definitely worth seeking out on a rainy day. 

Bodleian Library

No stay in Oxford would be complete without visiting one of the world’s oldest and most famous libraries. The Bodleian is home to a stunning collection that includes rare hand-drawn maps, early Shakespeare editions and documents from famous writers including Samuel Pepys. Beyond its contents, the Bodleian is also one of Oxford’s most beautiful buildings. 

Oxford Playhouse

For those interested in theatre and performance, the Oxford Playhouse is a must-see venue. It regularly hosts touring productions, which include popular classics as well as the best new theatre featuring both well-known and emerging talents. It also offers events around classical music and experimental performance and hosts lectures on topics as diverse as physics and fashion.

St Michael at the North Gate

If you’d like an aerial view of the city, head to St Michael at the North Gate Church to climb its 14th-century tower, which offers sweeping views of the city. Formerly part of Oxford’s medieval city wall, the tower was also once a prison in which prominent prisoners were held during the reign of Henry VIII.

The Genetic Garden

Founded by Professor Cyril Darlington, this fascinating garden is one of the Oxford University Parks. It was established as a living demonstration of how evolution works. It displays many examples of hybrids, chromosomal number changes, contortions and varietal evolutions.

Oxford Cricket Pavilion

Cricket enthusiasts – or those who simply want to learn about this most English of sports – will be thrilled to learn that not only does Oxford boast a world-class cricket ground, but also that spectators are admitted free of charge.

Archive

Syndication